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section four: local, integrated sports provision

Introduction

176. Local authorities are responsible for 90 per cent of public sector expenditure on sport. Local authorities are also the number one provider of sport facilities: they provide two thirds of sporting facilities, with sports clubs and other private sector organisations providing the remainder.89

177. Given the leading role played by local authorities, it is important to examine the role of local authorities in supporting the sporting infrastructure, not only in terms of the sports facilities that local authorities operate but also the partnership work that is done at local level between councils, local clubs and sports governing bodies.

178. This section of the report examines the following matters:

  • local authorities’ statutory responsibilities;
  • sports hubs; and
  • integrated local sports strategies.

Local authorities’ statutory responsibilities

179. The Local Government and Planning (Scotland) Act 1982 sets out that each council has a responsibility to “ensure that there is adequate provision of facilities for the inhabitants of their area for recreational, sporting, cultural and social activities.”

180. The term “adequate” was not defined in the Act and has not subsequently been defined in statute. The Committee is not aware of any legal challenge being made to whether a local authority has fulfilled its statutory duties.

181. Local authorities’ responsibilities were set out in guidance issued to themin 2003 entitled Implementation of the National Cultural Strategy, Guidance for Scottish Local Authorities, COSLA and Scottish Executive. This guidance acknowledges that, in some respects, the legislation is vague in relation to the principal statutory duties and powers for local authorities. As a result, there is variation between individual local authorities’ provision as they have interpreted it differently in accordance with their own policy priorities and resource availability.90

182. The guidance states that it is for each local authority to consider how best to meet the needs of its area. It provides recommendations about the development and implementation of plans for facilities and activities and the need to work with others to provide services and activities. The guidance does not detail any particular facilities or sports that should be provided by a local authority.91

183. The current statutory framework has been subject to criticism. For example, VOCAL – the professional association that represents local government chief officers who have responsibility for sport and culture – stated in written evidence that “since the term ‘adequate’ has never been defined or tested the legislation is largely meaningless.”92

184. The Scottish Government does not consider that it should define what constitutes adequate provision of facilities. In a written parliamentary answer, the Minister for Public Health and Sport stated that “the Scottish Government believes it is for local authorities to determine according to local needs and circumstances.”93

Sports hubs

185. The Scottish Government outlined to the Committee its proposals for the future development of facilities and the provision of sports. It is clear that it envisages community sports hubs playing a central role. The Minister for Public Health and Sport believed that “the community sports hubs are a good model which I want to be embraced in all areas of Scotland.”94

186. Community sports hubs aim to create a co-ordinated network of key players in sport around a particular facility in a particular local community. According to the Minister, the hub is not just a physical cluster of sport facilities but an opportunity for the key players in sport to interact together—

“The purpose of the community sports hub is to sweat the asset of the school estate to some degree, but it is also to bring together the schools, clubs, council officers and national governing bodies locally under the umbrella of a single community sports organisation to add value to what is already going on, fill the gaps and get things working.”95

187. The Scottish Government is developing the model by engaging local authorities and community planning partnerships through the Commonwealth Games Legacy Plan 2014.99 The Scottish Government views community sports hubs as being sufficiently flexible to be adapted to suit both urban and rural areas.

188. Members saw for themselves the new £27.3 million Stirling Sports Village development. Active Stirling and Stirling Council view this facility as creating the ideal environment for a community sports hub. This will integrate local communities and individuals with schools, clubs and elite performers.97

189. In supplementary written evidence, the Scottish Government also highlighted several examples of good practice in the development of community sports hubs. One example cited was Broxburn United Sports Club which aims to become a community club in partnership with West Lothian Council. The Council invested £1.6 million and sportscotland provided £500,000 towards construction of new facilities which began in January 2009. The new facilities aim to increase the level of participation in the club and, in the long term, to provide opportunities for participation by members of the local community in equestrianism, water sports and boxing, opportunities that currently do not exist in the area.98

190. In oral and supplementary written evidence, the Scottish Association for Local Sports Councils cited Glen Urquhart High School in Drumnadrochit as being an excellent modern hub in a rural setting —

“The new facilities enabled the existing sports clubs within the local area (mainly shinty) to take advantage, but the greatest benefit came from the fact that a wide range of people, young and old, from within the community (some with no organised sporting interest) had access to the facilities – this enables a central pooling of talent and interest to come together”.

191. The Committee, therefore, agrees with the principle behind the Scottish Government’s strive for community sports hubs. The Committee sees sports hubs as most likely to be effective in the delivery of quality sports facilities where they form part of an integrated local strategy.

Integrated local sports strategies

192. The AGS report stated that, as of November 2007, only half of all councils had publicly available sports strategies. The AGS report went on to criticise the lack of a co-ordinated approach to the delivery of facilities—

“the provision of sports facilities and other services is currently fragmented, with no clear links between the Scottish Government’s national strategy for sport and councils’ investment of money in facilities and services across Scotland.“99

193. Reaching Higher states that one of its national priorities is to achieve ‘quality facilities’. It places a responsibility on local authorities to bring together all relevant bodies, including governing bodies and clubs, through its community planning process and to integrate sports planning into other relevant frameworks, such as education. The strategy leaves it up to local authorities and their partners to determine the details of the sports framework, suggesting either a stand alone sports plan or integrating sport into a wider framework.

194. According to Reaching Higher,each plan should identify gaps in provision participation and link into the work of other key sports agencies. Each plan should also address national priorities, demonstrating how it is intended to achieve various actions, including gathering and analysing qualitative and quantitative data; identifying priorities at a local level; agreeing resources and expected outcomes, and scrutinising the delivery outcomes effectively.

195. One of the primary aims of single outcome agreements is for each council to detail how it will improve national outcomes for local people in a way that reflects local circumstances and priorities. As such, there appears to be a very large overlap between single outcome agreements and the aims of Reaching Higher in respect of the provision of quality facilities.

196. According to VOCAL, “the extent to which sport features in single outcome agreements varies between local authority areas but the trend towards limiting the number of local outcomes and having higher level agreements is likely to reduce the profile of sport with the consequent risk that its potential contribution to broader policy areas like health and the quality of community life will not be sufficiently recognised”.100

197. The Committee is concerned by this state of affairs, particularly since the development of single outcome agreements would appear to offer an ideal opportunity for community planning partnerships to consider the full potential of sport in their area and also assist in the development of sports facilities strategies that address local needs.

198. The Committee recognises the scepticism that exists around strategies. The perception is that ‘working up a strategy’ is done at the expense of doing the unglamorous, on-the-ground work necessary to ensure that local services are provided more efficiently and effectively. However, the Committee agrees with the views of VOCAL that there is merit in strategies if they include an implementation plan and are used as a means of checking (1) whether individual policy decisions are rational and sensible and (2) whether what was intended is actually being achieved.101

199. The Committee therefore recommends that those local authorities that do not have local sports strategies (including implementation plans) should produce them. The Committee also recommends that the local authorities that do have existing strategies should make sure that they are up-to-date and are used as means to ensure that plans are being implemented in accordance with the strategies.

200. The Committee considers that each sport strategy should, at least, include the following elements:

  • the teaching of PE and transition into sport outside of school;
  • facilities, including (1) the maintenance and upgrading of facilities and (2) improving access to local authority facilities, including use of the school estate by the wider community; and
  • capacity building in local sports clubs.

201. The Committee views sports hubs as being one means by which local authority sports facilities can be delivered. The Committee considers that sports hubs need to be about more than just physical facilities. They should be about making the most of physical and human resources. On the latter, this means a common approach being adopted by PE teachers/ ASCs/ASMs/Sports Development Officers and local representatives of clubs to the development of a sports strategy.

202. The Committee considers that it is vital, where practicable and appropriate, that the sports hub policy be adopted in a systematic manner across Scotland. The Committee considers that it is incumbent on the Scottish Government to drive the sports hub policy. Accordingly, the Committee considers that the second cycle of single outcome agreements is an opportunity for the Scottish Government, with input from sportscotland, to challenge how community planning partnerships are specifically addressing the Scottish Government’s national outcomes with reference to sport.

203. The Committee therefore recommends that the Scottish Government does not sign off any new single outcome agreement unless it is satisfied that the local community planning partnership has a cogent sports strategy in place.

204. In paragraph 200, there is a list of the elements that the Committee considers should be present in each local authority’s sports strategy. The report has already considered the first element – the teaching of PE and transition into sport outside school. The final part of the report addresses various matters that have arisen in the course of the inquiry in relation to the other two elements, namely facilities and capacity building in local sports clubs.

Facilities

205. Sportscotland’s view is that the availability, accessibility and quality of facilities will influence whether people take part in sport, which sports they enjoy, how often they participate and how well they perform.102

The national picture

206. The national picture was given in the AGS report, where it is stated that there are over 11,000 sport facilities in Scotland, of which four fifths are outdoor facilities and one fifth indoor facilities.103 A national audit of Scotland’s sports facilities was conducted by sportscotland in 2006. It surveyed the sports facilities operated by clubs, schools, further education and commercial sectors as well as those operated by local authorities. The findings included—

  • 46% of all indoor facilities were constructed in the 1970s and 1980s. While some have already been refurbished, many now require significant levels of re-investment to upgrade their condition and keep them operational.
  • 74% of natural grass pitches, 61% of synthetic grass pitches and 50% of tennis courts require replacement or significant upgrading.
  • 45% of course-owning golf clubs have incomes below the level required to maintain their facilities to a good standard on an ongoing basis.104

207. This national audit indicated that the capital cost of upgrading facilities to an acceptable standard would require investment of £110 million a year or £2,742m over 25 years and a further £196m per annum in routine maintenance costs. The national audit identified a likely gap between the money required and that likely to be available for facilities.

208. It is worth noting that, prior to the national audit taking place, a specific audit of the provision of swimming pools in Scotland was undertaken in 1999-2000. This audit resulted in the report, Ticking time bomb report: the maintenance, upgrading and refurbishment of Scotland’s public pools (“the Ticking Time Bomb Report”).105 This report estimated the level of investment required to keep Scotland’s public swimming pools open and provided guidance on the choice between refurbishment and replacement. The report found there to be 338 public pools and estimated that, in aggregate, the total maintenance, upgrading and refurbishment cost for Scotland would be £544m (including VAT). It also recommended adopting a good practice approach to pool maintenance, periodic upgrading and refurbishment. In addition the report noted that the costs incurred would be significantly more than the amounts allowed for in many, if not most, public pool maintenance budgets.

209. Reaching Higher refers to the national audit and The Ticking Time Bomb Report and notes that significant investment is required across the ageing stock of sporting facilities106.

210. The National and Regional Sports Facilities Strategy administered by sportscotland provides Scottish Government and national lottery funds to improve sports facilities. It aims to encourage councils and others to invest in major multi-sport developments across the country and contributes up to 30 per cent towards the cost of projects107.

211. By 2004, £48.5 million had been committed towards ten national and regional projects with a total cost of £230 million. The AGS report stated that progress in developing multi-sport facilities had been slower than expected. By March 2008, only four of the original ten projects were on schedule to meet target completion dates.108 It should be noted that another of the original projects, the Forthbank Sports Village (the home of the Stirling sports hub referred to above) is now open.

212. Members visited the Forthbank Sports Village which they found to be a tremendously impressive facility, with a mix of third generation outside pitches and a sports centre with sports hall, gym and climbing wall facilities. Perhaps the most impressive part of the development is the energy-efficient manner in which the ice rink has been located side-by-side with the swimming pool, whereby the heat generated from the ice rink warms up the swimming pool water.

213. Before considering the challenges that councils face in maintaining and upgrading community facilities, it is worth listing just a few of the positive major sporting infrastructure developments that have occurred in recent years:

  • world class facilities for mountain biking developed across Scotland, most notably in the Borders and the Highlands;
  • the largest indoor climbing wall in the world is in Ratho, near Edinburgh;
  • major new indoor football pitch developments are close to completion in Glasgow and North Lanarkshire.

214. The developments listed above illustrate that the type of facilities that are needed now are different to those that have been provided in the past. The range of sports and physical activities that people are interested in is wider than at any time in the past. This was one of the key messages that came through from the evidence sessions with the elite athletes. It is undeniably challenging to deliver the standard of facilities for which there is a demand for all these activities given resource constraints.

The local picture

215. According to the AGS report, councils have invested significant funds in sports facilities in recent years. They have provided new or replacement swimming pools, sports halls, outdoor pitches and have upgraded existing facilities. New sport facilities have also been delivered through the upgrading of councils’ school estate. Between 2002 and 2007, councils invested £385 million of capital expenditure on recreation, sports and parks. However, according to the AGS report, there is no published breakdown of how much was spent per council or what each council delivered.109

216. As might be expected, there was a good deal of criticism in the evidence received about the state of local authority-provided community facilities. Among the criticisms were that the physical design and layout of some facilities meant that multi-use facilities were actually inaccessible for some sports (for example volleyball and squash). Basic facilities such as appropriate changing facilities (for women in particular) were often cited as being of a poor standard: Renfrewshire Council highlighted this, as did Liz McColgan in referring to the facilities that her home club, Dundee Hawkhill Harriers, uses.110

217. The Committee received evidence on the decaying stock of some sport facilities. Meadowbank Sports Stadium and Sports Centre in Edinburgh was cited as being a particularly sad case, which had once been a prestigious facility (hosting the 1970 and 1986 Commonwealth Games) but which has suffered from under-investment as a long-running debate has taken place over its future. The introduction of an antiques fair in Meadowbank Sports Centre has further reduced the availability of sports facilities at the weekend.

218. The Committee considers that the poor condition of ageing existing facilities is of equal importance to the number of new facilities. It is clear to the Committee that the research from sportscotland and the AGS report shows that substantial investment is required to upgrade indoor and outdoor facilities across Scotland.

219. It is disappointing to note that, according to sportscotland, only a minority of local authorities currently have sports facilities strategies. As of May 2008, 14 local authorities had completed pitch strategies, with a further six underway; five local authorities had completed facilities strategies with a further seven underway.

220. Furthermore, sportscotland’s evidence was that few local authorities consider the full stock of facilities in the local area, including those that are held in the commercial and voluntary sector.

221. The Committee considers that a facility strategy is a key component of a local sports strategy. The Committee reiterates its earlier recommendation that each community planning partnership should have a sports strategy, which includes an implementation plan. This strategy should include a facilities component that covers specific, timed actions and local indicators by which performance can be appropriately monitored.

222. The Committee wishes to highlight three further matters in relation to sporting physical infrastructure—

  • ice rinks;
  • outdoor sports pitches; and
  • the school estate.

Ice rinks

223. The current and future provision of ice rinks was highlighted as an area of particular concern, as a result of rinks having experienced an increase in overhead costs, particularly electricity and water costs.111 A key factor identified as affecting rinks’ future financial viability is their requirement to adhere to new EU regulations that require the removal and replacement of plants that use an R22 refrigerant (a hydrochlorofluorocarbon contributing to global warming). These regulations come into force on 1 January 2010 and by 2014 it will be illegal to use R22 as a refrigerant. The majority of ice rinks use R22 gas and it is thought that the cost of replacing the plant machinery could run to hundreds of thousands of pounds.

224. The Committee learned that several ice rinks have closed in recent years, including those at Letham Grange, Brora, Forest Hills, Gogar, Aviemore and the Centrum in Prestwick. The Linx ice arena in Aberdeen is also currently closed.112 (Against this trend, a new curling ice rink has recently been opened in Aberdeen.)

225. The Committee received evidence from petitioner Parisa Tadjali who is campaigning against the closure of Ayrshire’s skating facilities. Her local ice rink in Prestwick has closed and her club now uses an ice rink in Ayr. The ice rink is owned by a curling club in Ayr and is used not just for curling but by Ayr Figure Skating Club, Kyle Figure Skating Club and for ice hockey.

226. The picture across Scotland is that many curling clubs are running close to full capacity. This means that there is little scope for development work to take place with a lack of free rinks to run development sessions.113 If this is the case for curling alone, there would appear to be very little scope for other sports, like ice skating, to share facilities.

227. Colin Grahamslaw of Curling Scotland told the Committee that “there are a large number of issues and a large number of ice rinks are at crisis point. A major issue is coming up for ice sports in Scotland.”114

228. The Committee is particularly concerned at the decline in ice rinks in Scotland. The Committee considers that there appears to be a systemic issue, rather than it being simply a matter of difficult local decisions having to be taken by local authorities.

229. The Committee therefore recommends that the Scottish Government set up a task force to look at the challenges in operating ice rinks, especially in relation to compliance with the EU legislation on the use of R22 gas, and examine what action needs to be taken to ensure that there are sustainable numbers of ice rinks in Scotland to serve the needs of the ice sports community in Scotland. The Committee recommends that the task force examine whether any EU funding is available to ease the cost of complying with the new regulations.

Outdoor sports pitches

230. For many years, there has been concern about the state of Scotland’s outdoor sports pitches. Colin Rennie of Fields in Trust criticised the accessibility and usability of sport pitches which he stated were in a dreadful condition.115 Peter Bilsborough of the University of Stirling also supported the claim that the provision of sports pitches was appalling and called for an audit of the quantity and quality of outdoor sports pitches.116

231. Since June 1996, the Scottish Sport Council (now sportscotland) has had statutory consultee status for developments affecting playing fields. In November 2007, this role was expanded so that sportscotland must now be consulted on any development likely to affect tennis courts, bowling greens, golf courses, athletics tracks and sports pitches of 0.2 hectares or more, including those used for small-sided games, like seven-a-side football.117

232. The Committee welcomes the wider, statutory role that sportscotland now has in relation to planning applications affecting sports pitches. There appears to be some evidence that as a result of sportscotland’s intervention, some planning applications for developments, which would have led to the loss of sports facilities, have not proceeded118 119.

233. The Committee’s view is that what matters is not the square metreage of the pitches available, but how useable and accessible they are. Across Scotland, the trend is to build more artificial outdoor pitches. They stand up to Scotland’s weather better than grass or red blaes and, as a result, will be more available for multi-sport use. They are, however, comparatively expensive to build and, as a consequence there are fewer of these pitches than the grass or blaes pitches that are increasingly being replaced. The Committee recognises that, while the headline figure may show that there are fewer pitches than there once were, the Committee considers this to be less important than how often the pitches are capable of being used.

234. While the Committee is less concerned than Fields in Trust by the overall state of Scotland’s outdoor pitches, the Committee adds a number of caveats to this position.

235. Firstly, artificial pitches require careful maintenance in order for them to enjoy a long life and the Committee notes that one of the persistent criticisms of local authorities is that sports facilities, once built, have not been properly maintained. The Committee considers it is absolutely imperative that pitches are not allowed to be run down in the way that has happened in the past.

236. Secondly, artificial pitches must be available for a range of sports and not just for football.

237. Thirdly, concern has been expressed that the cost of hire of these pitches can be very high for schools, sports clubs and the wider community. The Committee heard evidence that the pricing structures of local authorities, leisure trusts and PPP facilities mean that people from more deprived socio-economic backgrounds cannot afford to use new facilities. Given the links between physical activity and public health and the evidence on health inequalities, the Committee is very concerned that these financial barriers may be working against other public health policies, including Equally Well.

School estate – sportscotland’s role in the planning process

238. Under the School Premises (General Requirements and Standards) (Scotland) Regulations 1967, there is a requirement for every school to have available to it playing fields whose area is related to the roll of the school.120 Colin Rennie of Fields in Trust told the Committee that new schools are being built that do not meet the current regulations in relation to the provision of outdoor spaces for sport, recreation and play.121

239. Sportscotland is not a statutory consultee in relation to the provision of new school facilities and Stewart Harris of sportscotland told the Committee that sportscotland has to make its case in terms of the design of facilities in new schools on a case-by-case and local authority-by-local authority basis122.

240. The Committee fails to see why sportscotland is a mandatory consultee when planning applications are made to develop sports pitches but that it has no such status when it comes to built structure generally, and the development of new sports facilities in schools more specifically. The current position appears illogical and short-sighted and the Committee, therefore, recommends that the Scottish Government should modify the planning regulations to give sportscotland a right to be consulted on new developments. The Committee also recommends that there should be a requirement on local authorities to publish any advice received from sportscotland along with any report on the application.

School estate – access

241. Since 2000, £3.9 billion had been committed by central and local government to improving Scotland’s school estate. 219 new schools have been delivered, with many others having been significantly improved.123 In a recent written parliamentary answer, the Scottish Government stated that the school estate is set to receive continued significant investment with the infrastructure investment plan, delivering £1 billion in projects over £5 million in the next five years. The Scottish Government [still] aims to deliver [a further] 250 new or [substantially] refurbished schools by 2011124.

242. From a sports facilities perspective this has meant that many new, publicly-funded facilities have become available. For example, in Falkirk Council area a new swimming pool was built with each new secondary school. The City of Glasgow Council has taken a decision to build a flood-lit seven-a-side artificial pitch with each of its new build primary schools.125

243. A major frustration highlighted by several witnesses was the barrier to gaining access to these new and improved school sport facilities. VOCAL told the Committee that there were several reasons why school facilities are under-used by the community—

  • the cost of employing janitors at overtime rates;
  • the design and specification of many school facilities is not particularly well suited to either competitive sport or casual community use;
  • many PFI/PPP contracts did not allow for much time for community use because of affordability issues.126

244. In written evidence, sportscotland stated that “the advent of PFI and PPP operated schools had had variable impacts, unfortunately sometimes detrimental, largely dependent on how the contracts were written in respect of community access and charging regimes”.

245. The Committee notes the views expressed that several of the worst excesses of the PFI arrangements have changed in recent years. In written evidence, the Scottish Government referred to the AGS report, Improving the school estate,which indicated that most of the councils included in that study now charge the same for their schools, whether they are PFI-funded or not, and that this was specified in their contracts. The Committee is also aware that the City of Glasgow Council has bought out the public-private partnership contract that imposed an extra charge for access to school facilities at weekends, so that access to facilities costs the same throughout the week.127

246. Bob McGowan of Stirling Council indicated that, when new schools were built in Stirling Council, access arrangements were built into the contractual arrangements which gave the council a degree of control on access to facilities128. (This view was not entirely shared by Graham Coull of Stirling Triathlon Club who told the Committee of the difficulty that the club had in accessing the sports facilities for a reasonable cost, outside of the core operating hours from 9 am to 10 pm Monday to Friday129.)

247. VOCAL also acknowledged that some councils have tackled these issues but it believes there is a need for a national initiative led by the Scottish Government or sportscotland to ‘unlock the potential’ for schools to be more widely used by the wider community130.

248. The Committee agrees with this sentiment. The Committee also notes that sportscotland has produced guidance for the different management regimes that apply within school sites. As with other areas in sports policy, it would appear that the necessary guidance exists (as prepared in this case by sportscotland) but that the guidance has been, at best, only patchily used by local authorities.

Capacity building in local sports clubs

249. Reaching Higher identifies having well-trained people as being a national sporting priority. That report states “people are our most important resource: well trained, motivated, confident and capable coaches, officials and volunteers are core to the delivery of our vision”.

250. In oral evidence, Tommy Boyle of the Winning Scotland Foundation asked whether local clubs have the coaching and volunteering capacity to maximise the investment that has been made in the Active Schools programme. He said “the answer is probably a big no.”131

251. While strategic leadership and guidance nationally can provide support, there is consensus that the links between schools and sports clubs need to be generated at a local level. The Committee considers that a key part of local sports strategies should be community sports development.

252. Sports development officers are employed by local authorities and by national governing bodies. The Committee is aware that, as a result of proceeds of crime legislation, a Cashback-for-Communities scheme exists which has resulted significant amounts of money being given to national governing bodies to assist in sports development across Scotland. For example as a result of this type of funding, rugby union has been able to (1) extend its coaching programmes in primary and secondary schools (2) commit more funds to club development (3) establish a youth coaching certificate (4) develop its non-contact, portable street rugby programme.

253. Clubs tend to thrive in affluent areas due to there being, generally speaking, a greater willingness by the more affluent to put themselves forward for office-holder positions. The club infrastructure can be vulnerable due to the demands that are placed on volunteers’ time. Clearly, if there are more volunteers, the workload is spread and it becomes more manageable to run a club. Broadly speaking, it is accepted that more support is needed to establish and foster clubs in poorer areas.

254. The evidence of the Scottish Association of Local Sports Councils amplifies the point. One of its principal concerns was the lack of volunteers at all levels, particularly to assist with non-coaching roles. The effect of this is that coaches often then have to fulfil some of these functions, meaning that there is reduced time available for coaching.

255. As the breach may be filled by other volunteers who put in long hours to cover several different roles, this can be seen to exacerbate the situation as potential volunteers are put off by the long hours that they see are being put in by the existing coaches and volunteers (often with very little reward or recognition attached to it).

256. Given that the physical activity and public health statistics are at their worst in our most deprived communities, it is critical that support is given to volunteers to run clubs.132 As the lead partner (and provider of 90 per cent of sports funding), the Committee considers that local authorities should prioritise the building of capacity in local sports clubs in deprived areas.

257. The Committee considers that local authorities need to improve co-ordination with sports governing bodies. The Committee is aware that many of the bigger sports (most notably football, rugby union and golf) have highly developed outreach programmes and the Committee considers that local authorities, together, need to co-ordinate their own sports development work better with governing bodies.

258. One illuminating comment received in evidence from a representative of a governing body was—

“It has been said that the [32] local authorities take 32 different approaches, and that there is not consistency between how sport sits within local authorities: it sits in different departments with different responsibilities.”133

259. This chimes with the Committee’s views that, while there is undoubtedly excellent sports development work going on in every local authority, in too many instances, the work is fragmented rather than being part of an integrated sports strategy. The Committee considers that COSLA and VOCAL have a duty to take the lead in making partnership working between local authorities, governing bodies and individual sports clubs more straightforward and uniform than would currently appear to be the case. Equally, the Committee considers that there is an onus on national governing bodies to undertake more partnership working in order to present united positions to local authorities, for example in relation to how a local sports hub might operate.

260. The Committee considers that local authorities need better to recognise the positive impact that well-run sports clubs can have on the local community. The Committee is aware that several local authorities throughout Scotland have systems of club accreditation that ‘reward’ those clubs with a strong community focus, including strong junior sections and pro-active outreach work. The quid pro quo for these clubs is that they are then given preferential status when it comes to using local authority facilities.

261. Relevant to the discussion about club accreditation is Positive Coaching Scotland (PCS), a programme developed by the Winning Scotland Foundation. The PCS system is based on the view that 99.5% of children never achieve elite sports level but that the approach to coaching can be one based on a “win at all costs” mentality inherited from professional sport. The PCS view is that children should be coached as individuals, focusing on their long-term development. The PCS system promotes a system whereby more important than winning (in non-elite sport) is teaching young people life skills.

262. Winning Scotland points to the fact that over 70% of young people drop out of sport by the age of 14, with the figure being significantly higher for girls. PCS creates a positive environment in youth sport which focuses on encouraging effort and learning, improving performance and fostering competition. This helps young people deal positively with mistakes.

263. The long term aim of PCS is to change the culture in sport and encourage more coaches, volunteers, businesses and local authorities to establish a new kitemark for sports clubs and sports coaches in Scotland.134 There are currently 13 PCS programmes for various sports across five local authorities. Different models are currently being piloted at the moment to ascertain the model best fit for purpose.

264. The Committee was very impressed by the long-term potential that PCS appears to have in addressing community participation issues. The Committee recommends that the Scottish Government and sportscotland work with the Winning Scotland Foundation to consider how the positive coaching model can be rolled out across the whole of Scotland in as wide a range of sports as is feasible.

265. The Committee welcomes the various club accreditation schemes that have evolved across Scotland. However, the Committee considers that it would be much more coherent (and less bureaucratic for individual sports) if a national scheme were to be established. The Committee therefore recommends that sportscotland lead a project with COSLA and national governing bodies to agree a set of common standards which would need to be in place in order for a sports club to obtain accreditation.

section five: conclusions and summary of recommendations

266. The backdrop to the Committee’s inquiry is Scotland’s continuing poor public health record. Despite there being a public understanding that leading a physically active lifestyle has positive health benefits, there are worrying signs of Scots becoming less and less physically active.

267. The Committee recognises that the staging in the UK of several of the world’s most prestigious sporting events in the early years of the next decade (most pertinently the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow) offers a massive opportunity to raise the profile of sport.

268. The international evidence is that it is notoriously difficult to achieve a lasting legacy from sports events, in particular the transformation of grassroots sport and mass public participation. The Committee’s view is that it is vital that the groundwork be done in advance so that the infrastructure is in place to take advantage of the momentum that the Olympic and Commonwealth Games will undoubtedly provide.

269. The goal of the Committee in this inquiry has been to encourage physical activity and, in particular, understand why mass participation rates are poor and to investigate the barriers that Scots face in the early stages of their pathway into sport.

270. The inquiry focused on three main topics—

  • the teaching of physical education in schools;
  • the Active Schools programme; and
  • the need for integrated, local sports provision.

271. The Committee’s main conclusions and recommendations are set out below.

Why PE matters

272. The Committee’s starting point is that the target of the provision of two hours of quality PE for each child every week is not a target for its own sake. The Committee agrees with the Minister for Schools and Skills that PE is the only comprehensive and educationally sound way we have to ensure that all children and young people have the skills and understanding necessary to live a physically active life. (paragraph 88)

273. The target represents an input measure that is meant to ensure that all children receive the PE that they require in order to achieve the outcome of being physically literate in order to be able to participate in physical activity outside of school and into adulthood. (paragraph 89)

274. While the Committee is under no illusion that meeting the two hour PE target will, of itself, be a panacea to turning around our national physical inactivity, the Committee is convinced that the teaching of two hours of PE from primary to upper secondary school levels is of fundamental importance to the delivery of the wider physical activity agenda. The Committee believes that the provision of two hours of quality PE should be regarded as an entitlement for every school-aged child in Scotland as it provides them with a pathway to a lifetime of physical activity. The Committee also believes that a target should be established for structured play and physical activity at nursery school, as ways in which the principles behind physical literacy can be introduced to nursery-age children. (paragraph 92)

275. The Committee believes that the provision of two hours of PE should be recognised as being an absolute minimum. The Committee also considers that it is important that the PE target is not confused with other physical activity targets. While other school-related activity is strongly encouraged, it should not be conflated with two hours of taught PE, as part of the school week. (paragraph 90)

276. The Committee is disturbed by the evidence that it heard about the devaluation of PE and its failure to be recognised as being an integral part of a child’s development and well-being. There has been a lamentable failure to achieve the target in four academic years, set by the Scottish Executive in 2004. The Committee views the current position on the provision of PE in schools as unacceptable, in relation to (1) the half-hearted way in which educational authorities have implemented the policy and (2) the wholly unsatisfactory manner in which HMIE has monitored performance, which has resulted in parents and elected representatives not being informed about the standard of PE teaching in schools. (paragraph 93)

277. On the basis of the evidence, the conclusion that the Committee draws is that nobody has taken responsibility for delivering on the policy. The PE target, once adopted, was not given priority status, leading to a failure to adopt a co-ordinated approach to its implementation. It appears to the Committee that the lack of co-ordination between individual Directors of Education and headteachers is certainly one of the reasons behind the lack of progress in meeting the target. Furthermore, at a local authority level (and with honourable exceptions) the Committee agrees with the evidence from Colin Thomson of the Scottish Rugby Union that decision makers (in particular, some Directors of Education and individual headteachers) have not had the will to make it happen. (paragraph 94)

278. The Committee considers that PE has not been accorded the status that it should have enjoyed and that the failure to meet the two hour target and achieve satisfactory outcomes stems from this basic problem. The Committee believes that this must change. (paragraph 95)

PE: the need for leadership by central government

279. The Committee believes that the Scottish Government should give the target the prominence that it deserves by adopting it as a national performance measure. By doing so, not only would the Scottish Government’s resolve be unambiguous, but there would also be a framework in place whereby performance could be measured and assessed within central government. (paragraph 100)

280. Given the extent of the improvement in performance that will be required in many local authorities, the Committee would be very surprised if this did not translate into it being a priority, worthy of inclusion in relevant single outcome agreements. The Committee therefore recommends that the Scottish Government does not sign off any new single outcome agreement that does not feature the two hour target unless the local authority has already achieved the target or the Scottish Government is otherwise content that the local authority is firmly on track to meet the target by August 2010. (paragraph 103)

281. In addition to central government needing to show more ambition in relation to the teaching of physical education, the Committee also considers that the Scottish Government should give serious consideration as to how the NHS is contributing to community planning partnerships, particularly in relation to physical activity targets. If the Scottish Government does not consider that a HEAT target is the appropriate means to encourage health boards in this respect, the Committee looks forward to receiving the details of specific methods by which central government monitors the performance of health boards in contributing to delivering improvements in physical activity on a national basis. (paragraph 104)

PE: the performance of HM Inspectorate of Education

282. The Committee was disturbed by HMIE’s approach to the inspection of PE, in particular, its view that, if no reference is made to the provision of PE in a school inspection report, it should be assumed that the provision of PE is satisfactory. (paragraph 85)

283. This type of approach might possibly be appropriate and proportionate if the position across Scotland for the teaching of PE was strong as a whole. But the reality is that lamentable progress has been made since the introduction of the specific government target in 2004 (which followed on from a similar target set by sportscotland’s predecessor body back in 1999). That can be the only conclusion to be drawn since, to give one example, HMIE’s own unpublished records show that, of the schools that it inspected last year, only a third of primaries were providing two hours of PE per week. (paragraph 86)

284. The Committee considers that HMIE’s attitude towards the inspection and reporting of PE is symptomatic of the lowly status that PE has enjoyed over a number of years. The Committee is still not persuaded that HMIE has truly grasped that PE should have an equal status to other curricular subjects. (paragraph 87)

285. The Committee considers it is imperative that PE is inspected to the same level as all other curricular subjects. Inspection reports should be unambiguous and thorough, both in terms of PE provision and the outcome of physical literacy. This level of transparency will enable parents to assess individual schools’ performance and enable elected representatives to have a much clearer picture of physical education provision at local and national levels than is currently the case. (paragraph 107)

PE: what needs to change

286. The Committee was very impressed by East Renfrewshire Council’s approach to the teaching of PE. From the leadership of the Director of Education, what comes across is a sense of drive and clarity of purpose. Through a combination of firm leadership and extra support from council officers, coupled with dedicated professionalism on the part of teaching staff, East Renfrewshire has shown what can be achieved in a short timescale. (paragraph 134)

287. The Committee believes that East Renfrewshire should be used as a case study as to what can be achieved. The Committee is aware that East Renfrewshire Council is a compact local authority serving a reasonably small population which enjoys many socio-economic advantages over many other local authority areas. The Committee considers that these factors will be particularly beneficial when it comes to continuing the pathway into sport (these matters are considered later in the report). However the Committee does not consider that these factors apply to how PE is taught. In short, the Committee does not see why East Renfrewshire or a similar model could not be adopted elsewhere in Scotland. The Committee therefore recommends that the Scottish Government works with East Renfrewshire Council to ensure that their best practice is shared with other local authorities. (paragraph 135)

288. The formative work in physical literacy at nursery and primary is very important. The Committee is therefore attracted to the approach adopted in East Renfrewshire where a physical literacy assessment is carried out at P6. The Committee recommends that, at an appropriate age, a physical literacy assessment should be conducted for all pupils to ensure that, by the time children reach secondary school, they have the necessary skills to learn specific sports. The Committee also recommends that pupil report cards should refer to a pupil’s physical literacy skills. (paragraph 137)

289. The Committee welcomes the introduction of the postgraduate course in PE. There are encouraging signs of how PE specialists are being deployed in innovative ways across the country, including specialists supporting classroom teachers in delivering PE. The Committee considers that there is still a very real need for a general upskilling of all primary school classroom teachers in the teaching of PE. (paragraph 141)

290. The Committee recommends that the Scottish Government monitors the success of these courses, in particular the uptake by individual local authorities relative to the gap between the two hour target and actual performance. This point again highlights the need for detailed reporting on individual schools’ PE performance so that accurate statistics can be compiled. The Committee also recommends that the Scottish Government considers expanding these courses to universities beyond the central belt to make it easier for teachers to participate from across the country. (paragraph 139)

PE: meeting the target

291. The Committee considers that meeting the two hour target by August 2010 is challenging but realistic. The Committee considers that, at secondary level, educational authorities need to be prepared to take radical action to maximise the likelihood of the target being met. Such radical action may include the re-structuring of the school timetable, as happened in the case of East Renfrewshire. (paragraph 142)

292. The Committee recommends, that if any school is unable to meet this target by August 2010, the headteacher should be obliged to provide a report explaining why this is the case. This report should be made available to parents / guardians and submitted to the local authority Director of Education. The Committee recommends to the Scottish Government that, in these circumstances, the local authority Director of Education should be required to submit an action plan to the Cabinet Secretary for Education and the Cabinet Secretary for Health and Wellbeing, detailing how performance against the target will be improved in the local authority area. (paragraph 143)

The Active Schools programme

293. The Committee recommends to the Scottish Government that it should host a conference, involving all relevant parties (sportscotland, all local authorities and sports governing bodies), to reach agreement on how the Active Schools programme will be taken forward to 2011 and beyond, specifically with a view to reaching agreement on the following matters—

  • the role of the active schools co-ordinator (ASC), in particular the relationship that the ASC should have with PE staff, the headteacher, and community sports clubs;
  • how the ASC and the active schools manager (ASM) can best work with sports development officers and local community clubs to achieve better results in the transition from school to community club activity;
  • the extent to which the emphasis of Active Schools will change, if at all, as a result of the introduction of the Curriculum for Excellence; and
  • whether the focus of Active Schoolsshould shift to tackle areas where little or no progress has been made, in particular the engagement of children (and their parents) in the secondary 1 to 3 age range. (paragraph 175)

The need for integrated, local sports provision

294. The Committee recognises that while there is undoubtedly excellent sports development work going on in every local authority, in too many instances, the work is fragmented rather than being part of an integrated sports strategy. The Committee considers that COSLA and VOCAL – the professional association that represents local government chief officers who have responsibility for sport and culture – have a duty to take the lead in making partnership working between local authorities, governing bodies and individual sports clubs more straightforward and uniform than would currently appear to be the case. Equally, the Committee considers that there is an onus on national governing bodies to undertake more partnership working in order to present united positions to local authorities, for example in relation to how a local sports hub might operate. (paragraph 259)

295. The Committee recommends that those local authorities that do not have local sports strategies (including implementation plans) should produce them. The Committee also recommends that the local authorities that do have existing strategies should make sure that they are up-to-date and are used as means to ensure that plans are being implemented in accordance with the strategies. (paragraph 199)

296. The Committee considers that each sport strategy should, at least, include the following elements:

  • the teaching of PE and transition into sport outside of school;
  • facilities, including (1) the maintenance and upgrading of facilities and (2) improving access to local authority facilities, including use of the school estate by the wider community; and
  • capacity building in local sports clubs. (paragraph 200)

297. The Committee views sports hubs as being one means by which local authority sports facilities can be delivered. The Committee considers that sports hubs need to be about more than just physical facilities. They should be about making the most of physical and human resources. On the latter, this means a common approach being adopted by PE teachers/ASCs/ASMs/Sports Development Officers and local representatives of clubs to the development of a sports strategy. (paragraph 201)

298. The Committee considers that it is vital, where practicable and appropriate, that the sports hub policy be adopted in a systematic manner across Scotland. The Committee considers that it is incumbent on the Scottish Government to drive the sports hub policy. Accordingly, the Committee considers that the second cycle of single outcome agreements is an opportunity for the Scottish Government, with input from sportscotland, to challenge how community planning partnerships are specifically addressing the Scottish Government’s national outcomes with reference to sport. (paragraph 202)

299. The Committee therefore recommends that the Scottish Government does not sign off any new single outcome agreement unless it is satisfied that the local community planning partnership has a cogent sports strategy in place. (paragraph 203)

Ice rinks

300. The Committee is particularly concerned at the decline in ice rinks in Scotland. The Committee considers that there appears to be a systemic issue, rather than it being simply a matter of difficult local decisions having to be taken by local authorities. (paragraph 228)

301. The Committee therefore recommends that the Scottish Government set up a task force to look at the challenges in operating ice rinks, especially in relation to compliance with the EU legislation on the use of R22 gas, and examine what action needs to be taken to ensure that there are sustainable numbers of ice rinks in Scotland to serve the needs of the ice sports community in Scotland. The Committee recommends that the task force examine whether any EU funding is available to ease the cost of complying with the new regulations. (paragraph 229)

Outdoor sports pitches

302. The Committee’s view is that what matters is not the square metreage of the pitches available, but how useable and accessible they are. Across Scotland, the trend is to build more artificial outdoor pitches. They stand up to Scotland’s weather better than grass or red blaes and, as a result, will be more available for multi-sport use. They are, however, comparatively expensive to build and, as a consequence there are fewer of these pitches than the grass or blaes pitches that are increasingly being replaced. The Committee recognises that, while the headline figure may show that there are fewer pitches than there once were, the Committee considers this is less important than how often the pitches are capable of being used. The Committee adds a number of caveats to this position.

  • Firstly, artificial pitches require careful maintenance in order for them to enjoy a long life and the Committee notes that one of the persistent criticisms of local authorities is that sports facilities, once built, have not been properly maintained. The Committee considers it is absolutely imperative that pitches are not allowed to be run down in the way that has happened in the past.
  • Secondly, artificial pitches must be available for a range of sports and not just for football.
  • Thirdly, concern has been expressed that the cost of hire of these pitches can be very high for schools, sports clubs and the wider community. The Committee heard evidence that the pricing structures of local authorities, leisure trusts and PPP facilities mean that people from more deprived socio-economic backgrounds cannot afford to use new facilities. Given the links between physical activity and public health and the evidence on health inequalities, the Committee is very concerned that these financial barriers may be working against other public health policies, including Equally Well. (paragraph 233 - 237)

Sports facilities within schools

303. The Committee fails to see why sportscotland is a mandatory consultee when planning applications are made to develop sports pitches but that it has no such status when it comes to built structure generally and the development of new sports facilities in schools more specifically. The current position appears illogical and short-sighted and the Committee, therefore, recommends that the Scottish Government should modify the planning regulations to give sportscotland a right to be consulted on new developments. The Committee also recommends that there should be a requirement on local authorities to publish any advice received from sportscotland along with any report on the application. (paragraph 240)

The use of school sports facilities by the wider community

304. The Committee believes there is a need for a national initiative led by the Scottish Government or sportscotland to ‘unlock the potential’ for schools to be more widely used by the wider community. The Committee notes that sportscotland has produced guidance for the different management regimes that apply within school sites. As with other areas in sports policy, it would appear that the necessary guidance exists (as prepared in this case by sportscotland) but that the guidance has been, at best, only patchily used by local authorities. (paragraph 247-248)

Coaching and community clubs

305. The Committee was very impressed by the long-term potential that the positive coaching scotland model appears to have in addressing community participation issues. The Committee recommends that the Scottish Government and sportscotland work with the Winning Scotland Foundation to consider how the positive coaching scotland model can be rolled out across the whole of Scotland in as wide a range of sports as is feasible. (paragraph 264)

306. The Committee welcomes the various club accreditation schemes that have evolved across Scotland. However, the Committee considers that it would be much more coherent (and less bureaucratic for individual sports) if a national scheme were to be established. The Committee therefore recommends that sportscotland lead a project with COSLA and national governing bodies to agree a set of common standards which would need to be in place in order for a sports club to obtain accreditation. (paragraph 265)

Raising the profile of grassroots sport

307. As has already been stated, the Committee was disturbed by the lowly status that PE has had over a number of years. During the course of the inquiry, what came through was that there are many examples of individuals and clubs doing fantastic work at the grassroots level in sport. Much of this work is unheralded. The Committee considers that, as a nation, we need to be better at recognising the vital work that goes on in our communities.

308. As a final recommendation, the Committee considers that the Scottish Government or sportscotland should instigate a prize or awards event that recognises the work being done in the early stage of the pathway into sport. As ideas for consideration, the Committee suggests that there should be awards to honour:

  • PE teacher of the year;
  • Active schools co-ordinator of the year;
  • Active school of the year;
  • Community club of the year;
  • Sports club volunteer of the year; and
  • Award for outstanding example of sports development.


Annexe A: EXTRACT FROM THE MINUTES OF THE HEALTH AND SPORT COMMITTEE

6th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3)

Wednesday 27 February 2008

Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took evidence from Rhona Martin MBE.

9th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3)

Wednesday 26 March 2008

Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took evidence from Liz McColgan.

11th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3)

Wednesday 23 April 2008

Pathways into Sport: The Committee took evidence from Craig Brewster, Manager, Inverness Caledonian Thistle FC.

Mary Scanlon declared an interest having received a free ticket to an Inverness Caledonian Thistle FC match.

The Committee agreed to delegate to the Convener responsibility for arranging for the SPCB to pay, under Rule 12.4.3, any expenses of witnesses in respect of the inquiry.

12th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3)

Wednesday 30 April 2008

Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took oral evidence from Shirley Robertson.

18th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3)

Wednesday 18 June 2008

Pathways into sport: The Committee took evidence from Ian Edmond, Richard Gordon and Graeme Randall.

19th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3)

Wednesday 25 June 2008

Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took evidence from––

Jim Hamilton, Edinburgh Rugby;

Donna Kennedy, Coach, Scottish Women’s Rugby Union Academy;

Peter Wright, Director of Rugby, Glasgow Hawks;

and then from––

Gordon McKie, Chief Executive, Scottish Rugby;

Kenny Murray, Senior Sports Development Officer, Glasgow City Council;

Colin Thomson, Head of Community Rugby, Scottish Rugby;

Gregor Townsend, Scottish Institute of Sport Foundation.

Dr Richard Simpson declared an interest as a member of Stirling Rugby Club.

1st Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 14 January 2009

Decision on taking business in private: The Committee agreed to take in private at future meetings its consideration of any draft report on pathways into sport.

Pathways into sport inquiry – witness expenses: The Committee agreed to delegate to the Convener responsibility for arranging for the SPCB to pay, under Rule 12.4.3, any expenses of witnesses in the inquiry.

Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took evidence from—

John Beattie, Chair, Physical Activity Strategy Review Group;

Charlie Raeburn, former member of Scottish Executive PE Review Group;

Graham Watson, Executive Director, and Tommy Boyle, Programme Manager, Winning Scotland Foundation;

Oliver Barsby, Policy Director, Scottish Association of Local Sports Councils;

Gavin MacLeod, Chief Executive Officer, Scottish Disability Sport;

Chris Robison, Policy Director, Scottish Sports Association.

2nd Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 21 January 2009

Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took evidence from—

Suzanne Hargreaves, and Chris Wood, Secretary, Association for Physical Education (Scotland);

Alan Armstrong, Director of Education Improvement, Learning and Teaching Scotland;

Donald Macleod, HMIE Inspector, HM Inspectorate of Education;

Fraser Booth, School Leaders Scotland.

3rd Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 26 January 2009

Decision on taking business in private: The Committee agreed to discuss its recent fact-finding visits in private at a future meeting.

Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took evidence from—

Rob Hardie, Partnership Manager, SportCentral;

Brian Samson, Partnership Manager, SportTayside and Fife;

Bob McGowan, Services Manager, Schools, Stirling Council;

Peter Bilsborough, Director of Sports Development, and Alan Lynn, Senior Teaching Fellow in Sports Coaching, University of Stirling;

Stewart Harris, Chief Executive, and Mike Roberts, Director of Sports Development, sportscotland.

4th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 4 February 2009

1. Decisions on taking business in private: The Committee agreed to take item 4 in private.

4. Pathways into sport inquiry (in private): The Committee considered its approach to the remainder of the inquiry in the light of its recent fact-finding visits. The Committee agreed to take oral evidence from additional witnesses and to undertake additional fact-finding visits.

6th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 25 February 2009

Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took evidence from—

Lorna Sinclair, representative for petition PE1205;

Miriam Tadjali, and Parisa Tadjali, representatives for petition PE1173;

Erica Woollcombe, representative for petition PE1138;

Kevin Pringle, Chief Executive Officer, basketballscotland;

Graham Cormack, Coaching and Performance Development Manager, Camanachd Association;

Steve Paige, Community Development Manager, Cricket Scotland;

Colin Rennie, Development Manager for Scotland, Fields in Trust;

Graeme Morrison, Vice President, Mountaineering Council of Scotland;

Alison Turnbull, Promoting Walking Coordinator, Ramblers Scotland;

Raymond Farrelly, Head of Community Football, Rangers Football Club;

Colin Grahamslaw, Chief Executive Officer, Royal Caledonian Curling Club;

Jamie McDonald, Youth Development Officer, Scottish Athletics;

Jackie Davidson, Chief Executive, Scottish Cycling;

Jim Fleeting, Director of Football Development, Scottish Football Association;

Hamish Grey, Chief Executive, Scottish Golf Union;

Brent Deans, Chief Executive, Scottish Hockey;

Ian Pyrah, Partnership Director, Scottish Orienteering Association;

Colin Thomson, Head of Community Rugby Department, Scottish Rugby;

Kim Atkinson, Chief Operating Officer, Scottish Squash;

Ashley Howard, Chief Executive Officer, Scottish Swimming;

Thomas Dowens, Director of Coaching, Scottish Volleyball Association;

Graham Coull, Level 2 Coach, Stirling Tri Club.

7th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 4 March 2009

Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took evidence from—

Bruce Robertson OBE, former President, Association of Directors of Education Scotland;

Rodney Stone, Chair, VOCAL;

Ian Pye, Quality Improvement Officer, and John Wilson, Director of Education, East Renfrewshire Council;

George Black, Chief Executive, Glasgow City Council;

Ian Hooper, Director of Special Projects, Culture and Sport Glasgow.

8th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 11 March 2009

1. Decision on taking business in private: The Committee agreed to take item 9 in private.

2. Pathways into sport inquiry: The Committee took evidence from—

Shona Robison MSP, Minister for Public Health and Sport, Keith Brown MSP, Minister for Schools and Skills, Fergus Millan, Team Leader, Health Improvement Strategy, Kate Vincent, Deputy Director, Sport, Dr Claire Monaghan, Deputy Director, Curriculum, and Pat Morrison, Team Leader, Curriculum Content, Scottish Government.

9. Pathways into sport inquiry (in private): The Committee agreed to seek the approval of the Conveners Group for a plenary debate on its report on the inquiry.

9th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 18 March 2009

Pathways into sport inquiry (in private): The Committee considered an options paper for its draft report.

12th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 22 April 2009

Pathways into sport inquiry (in private): The Committee considered a draft report.

14th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 6 May 2009

Pathways into sport inquiry (in private): The Committee considered a draft report. Various changes were agreed to, and the Committee agreed to consider a revised draft at its next meeting.

15th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3)

Wednesday 13 May 2009

Pathways into sport inquiry (in private): The Committee considered a draft report. Various changes were agreed to. The report, as amended, was agreed to.

Annexe b: ORAL EVIDENCE AND ASSOCIATED WRITTEN EVIDENCE

Please note that all oral evidence and associated written evidence is published electronically only, and can be accessed via the Health and Sport Committee’s webpages, at:

http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/s3/committees/hs/inquiries/pathwaysintosport/index.htm

Phase 1

6th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3), Wednesday 27 February 2008

ORAL EVIDENCE

Rhona Martin

9th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3), Wednesday 26 March 2008

ORAL EVIDENCE

Liz McColgan

11th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3), Wednesday 23 April 2008

ORAL EVIDENCE

Craig Brewster, Manager, Inverness Caledonian Thistle FC

12th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3), Wednesday 30 April 2008

ORAL EVIDENCE

Shirley Robertson

18th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3), Wednesday 18 June 2008

ORAL EVIDENCE

Ian Edmond

Richard Gordon, Director of Coaching & Development, Scottish Swimming

Graeme Randall

19th Meeting, 2008 (Session 3), Wednesday 25 June 2008

ORAL EVIDENCE

Jim Hamilton, Edinburgh Rugby
Donna Kennedy, Coach, Scottish Women’s Rugby Union Academy
Peter Wright, Director of Rugby, Glasgow Hawks
Gordon McKie, Chief Executive, Scottish Rugby
Kenny Murray, Senior Sports Development Officer, Glasgow City Council
Colin Thomson, Head of Community Rugby, Scottish Rugby
Gregor Townsend, Scottish Institute of Sport Foundation

Phase 2

1st Meeting, 2009 (Session 3), Wednesday 14 January 2009

WRITTEN EVIDENCE

Charlie Raeburn 14.11.2008
Winning Scotland
Scottish Association of Local Sports Councils 17.12.2008
Scottish Disability Sport
Scottish Sports Association 27.11.2008

ORAL EVIDENCE

John Beattie, Chair, Physical Activity Strategy Review Group
Charlie Raeburn, former member of Scottish Executive PE Review Group
Graham Watson, Executive Director, and Tommy Boyle, Programme Manager, Winning Scotland Foundation
Oliver Barsby, Policy Director, Scottish Association of Local Sports
Councils
Gavin MacLeod, Chief Executive Officer, Scottish Disability Sport
Chris Robison, Policy Director, Scottish Sports Association

SUPPLEMENTARY WRITTEN EVIDENCE

John Beattie
Charlie Raeburn 15.01.2009
Charlie Raeburn 29.01.2009
Charlie Raeburn 25.02.2009
Scottish Association of Local Sports Councils 15.01.2009
Scottish Sports Association 23.02.2009

2nd Meeting, 2009 (Session 3), Wednesday 21 January 2009

WRITTEN EVIDENCE

Association for Physical Education (Scotland) 03.12.2008

ORAL EVIDENCE

Suzanne Hargreaves, and Chris Wood, Secretary, Association for Physical Education (Scotland)
Alan Armstrong, Director of Education Improvement, Learning and Teaching Scotland
Donald Macleod, HMIE Inspector, HM Inspectorate of Education
Fraser Booth, School Leaders Scotland

SUPPLEMENTARY WRITTEN EVIDENCE

Association for Physical Education (Scotland) 09.02.2009
Suzanne Hargreaves
HM Inspectorate of Education 13.02.2009
HM Inspectorate of Education 31.03.2009
School Leaders Scotland

3rd Meeting, 2009 (Session 3), Wednesday 26 January 2009

WRITTEN EVIDENCE

University of Stirling 20.11.2008
SportCentral 01.12.2008
sportscotland 25.11.2008
SportTayside & Fife 02.12.2008

ORAL EVIDENCE

Rob Hardie, Partnership Manager, SportCentral
Brian Samson, Partnership Manager, SportTayside and Fife
Bob McGowan, Services Manager, Schools, Stirling Council
Peter Bilsborough, Director of Sports Development, and Alan Lynn, Senior Teaching Fellow in Sports Coaching, University of Stirling
Stewart Harris, Chief Executive, and Mike Roberts, Director of Sports
Development, sportscotland

SUPPLEMENTARY WRITTEN EVIDENCE

SportCentral 03.02.2009
SportTayside and Fife 27.01.2009
University of Stirling 30.01.2009
sportscotland 29.01.2009
sportscotland 12.02.2009

6th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3), Wednesday 25 February 2009

WRITTEN EVIDENCE

Erica Woollcombe 25.11.2008
basketballscotland
Camanachd Association
Cricket Scotland
Fields in Trust
Mountaineering Council of Scotland
Ramblers Scotland
Rangers Football Club
Royal Caledonian Curling Club
Scottish Athletics
Scottish Cycling
Scottish Football Association
Scottish Golf Union
Scottish Hockey
Scottish Orienteering Association
Scottish Squash
Scottish Swimming
Scottish Volleyball Association
Stirling Tri Club

ORAL EVIDENCE

Lorna Sinclair, representative for petition PE1205
Miriam Tadjali, and Parisa Tadjali, representatives for petition PE1173
Erica Woollcombe, representative for petition PE1138
Kevin Pringle, Chief Executive Officer, basketballscotland
Graham Cormack, Coaching and Performance Development Manager, Camanachd Association
Steve Paige, Community Development Manager, Cricket Scotland
Colin Rennie, Development Manager for Scotland, Fields in Trust
Graeme Morrison, Vice President, Mountaineering Council of Scotland
Alison Turnbull, Promoting Walking Coordinator, Ramblers Scotland
Raymond Farrelly, Head of Community Football, Rangers Football Club
Colin Grahamslaw, Chief Executive Officer, Royal Caledonian Curling Club
Jamie McDonald, Youth Development Officer, Scottish Athletics
Jackie Davidson, Chief Executive, Scottish Cycling
Jim Fleeting, Director of Football Development, Scottish Football Association
Hamish Grey, Chief Executive, Scottish Golf Union
Brent Deans, Chief Executive, Scottish Hockey
Ian Pyrah, Partnership Director, Scottish Orienteering Association
Colin Thomson, Head of Community Rugby Department, Scottish Rugby
Kim Atkinson, Chief Operating Officer, Scottish Squash
Ashley Howard, Chief Executive Officer, Scottish Swimming
Thomas Dowens, Director of Coaching, Scottish Volleyball Association
Graham Coull, Level 2 Coach, Stirling Tri Club

SUPPLEMENTARY WRITTEN EVIDENCE

Erica Woollcombe 25.02.2009
Lorna Sinclair

7th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3), Wednesday 4 March 2009

WRITTEN EVIDENCE

VOCAL
East Renfrewshire Council
Culture and Sport Glasgow

ORAL EVIDENCE

Bruce Robertson OBE, former President, Association of Directors of Education Scotland
Rodney Stone, Chair, VOCAL
Ian Pye, Quality Improvement Officer, and John Wilson, Director of Education, East Renfrewshire Council
George Black, Chief Executive, Glasgow City Council
Ian Hooper, Director of Special Projects, Culture and Sport Glasgow

8th Meeting, 2009 (Session 3), Wednesday 11 March 2009

ORAL EVIDENCE

Shona Robison MSP, Minister for Public Health and Sport, Keith Brown MSP, Minister for Schools and Skills, Fergus Millan, Team Leader, Health Improvement Strategy, Kate Vincent, Deputy Director, Sport, Dr Claire Monaghan, Deputy Director, Curriculum, and Pat Morrison, Team Leader, Curriculum Content, Scottish Government

SUPPLEMENTARY WRITTEN EVIDENCE

Minister for Schools and Skills 23.03.2009
Minister for Schools and Skills 02.04.2009

Annexe c: LIST OF OTHER WRITTEN EVIDENCE

Submissions were also received from the following organisations in response to the original call for evidence:

Aberdeen City Council
Active Schools in West Lothian
Active Stirling and Stirling Council
After Schools Activity Programme
Alan Grosset
Angus Council
BADMINTONScotland
Balfron Barracudas Swimming Club
Black Isle Swimming Pool
Bruce Sinclair
Children 1st
Children in Scotland
Christopher H Plomer MBE
City of Edinburgh Council
Clackmannanshire Council
Clive Charters
Colleen Reid
Community Services, Fife Council
Consumer Focus Scotland
COSLA
Dumfries and Galloway Council
Dundee City Council
Dundee College
East Ayrshire Council
East Dunbartonshire Council
Highland Council
James Shields
John McCulloch
KA Leisure
Ken White
Liz Carrie
Marion Boyle
Midlothian Council
Moravian Orienteering Club
Moray Council
NHS Health Scotland
North Lanarkshire Council
North of Scotland Cycling Association
Orkney Islands Council
Physical Activity Strategy Review Group
Renfrewshire Council
Robert Gordon University
Ros Beck
Royal Yachting Association Scotland
Sally Wainman
Scottish Borders Council
Scottish Canoe Association
Scottish Government Health and Wellbeing Directive
Scottish Gymnastics
Scottish Parent Teacher Council
Scottish Premier League
Scottish Rugby
Scottish Sub Aqua Club
Scottish Universities Sport
Sense Scotland
Shetland Active Schools
Sustrans Scotland
Tennis Scotland
UK Sports Association for People with Learning Disabilities
University of Edinburgh
University of Glasgow
Volunteer Development Scotland
Warrender Bath Clubs
waterskiscotland
Youth Sport Trust
Youth Link Scotland


Footnotes:

89 Audit Scotland. (2008) A performance overview of sport in Scotland. Audit Scotland. Available at: http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/docs/central/2008/nr_080429_sport_overview.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

90 Scottish Executive (2003) Implementation of the National Cultural Strategy, Guidance for Scottish Local Authorities. Scottish Executive. Available at:http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/47034/0017724.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

91 Scottish Executive (2003) Implementation of the National Cultural Strategy, Guidance for Scottish Local Authorities. Scottish Executive. Available at:http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/47034/0017724.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

92 Voice of Chief Officers of Cultural and Leisure Services in Scotland. Written submission to the Health and Sport Committee.

93 Scottish Parliament, Official Report, Written Answers, 24 March 2009; S3W-21824.

94 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee Official Report, 11 March 2009, Col 1631.

95 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee. Official Report, 11 March 2009, Col 1663.

96 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee. Official Report, 11 March 2009, Col 1631-1632.

97 Active Stirling. Written submission to the Health and Sport Committee.

98 Scottish Government. Letter from Director-General Health and Chief Executive NHS Scotland to Convener of the Audit Committee dated September 2008.

99Audit Scotland. (2008) A performance overview of sport in Scotland. Audit Scotland. Available at: http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/docs/central/2008/nr_080429_sport_overview.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

100 VOCAL. Written submission to the Health and Sport Committee.

101 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee Official Report, 4 March 2009, Col 1607.

102 Scottish Executive. (2007) Reaching Higher: Building on the success of Sport 21.Scottish Executive.Available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Resource/Doc/169113/0047106.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

103 Audit Scotland. (2008) A performance overview of sport in Scotland. Audit Scotland. Available at: http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/docs/central/2008/nr_080429_sport_overview.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

104 sportscotland (2006) National Audit of Scotland’s Sports Facilities Summary Report. sportscotland. Available at: http://www.sportscotland.org.uk/NR/rdonlyres/0CC56D32-9F71-4330-A6A0-0DC8E1ED313C/0/NationalAuditofScotlandsSportsFacilities.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

105 sportscotland (2001) Ticking time bomb report: the maintenance, upgrading and refurbishment of Scotland’s public pools. sportscotland. Available at: http://www.sportscotland.org.uk/pages/download.aspx?id=%7B32AF8D39-D48F-4EBC-BF81-F2FDD7FEE4AA%7D

106 Scottish Executive. (2007) Reaching Higher: Building on the success of Sport 21. Scottish Executive. Available at: http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2007/03/07105145/0 [Accessed 11 May 2009]

107 Audit Scotland. (2008) A performance overview of sport in Scotland. Audit Scotland. Available at: http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/docs/central/2008/nr_080429_sport_overview.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

108 Audit Scotland. (2008) A performance overview of sport in Scotland. Audit Scotland. Available at: http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/docs/central/2008/nr_080429_sport_overview.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

109 Audit Scotland. (2008) A performance overview of sport in Scotland. Audit Scotland. Available at: http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/docs/central/2008/nr_080429_sport_overview.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

110 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee. Official Report, 26 March 2009, Col 706.

111 Scottish Parliament (2008) SPICe Petition briefing PE1173. Scottish Parliament. Available at: http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/business/research/petitionBriefings/pb-08/PB08-1173.pdf

112 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee, Official Report, 25 February 2009, Col 1570

113 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee, Official Report, 25 February 2009, Col 1570.

114 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee, Official Report, 25 February 2009, Col 1570.

115 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee, Official Report, 25 February 2009, Col 1571

116 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee, Official Report, 26 January 2009, Col 1477

117 Scottish Government. Written submission to the Health and Sport Committee 20 March 2009.

118 20 referrals have been made to Scottish Ministers as a result of sportscotland’s objections to planning applications. Of those applications referred to the Scottish Government, 13 have been cleared back to the planning authority for their determination, four withdrawn, one granted, one refused and one remains on going.

119 Scottish Government. Letter from the Minister for Schools and Skills to the Convener of the Health and Sport Committee dated 20 March 2009.

120 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee, Official Report, 11 March 2009, Col 1658.

121 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee, Official Report, 25 February 2009, Col 1538.

122 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee, Official Report, 26 January 2009, Col 1485-1486.

123 Audit Scotland (2008) Improving the school estate. Audit Scotland. Available at: http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/docs/central/2007/nr_080320_school_estate.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

Audit Scotland (2008) Improving the school estate. Audit Scotland. Available at: http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/docs/central/2007/nr_080320_school_estate.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

124 S3W-21825 – Helen Eadie (lodged 12 March 2009) answered Keith Brown, Minister for Schools and Skills (March 27 2009)

125 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee. Official Report, 4 March 2009, Col 1610.

126 VOCAL. Written submission to the Health and Sport Committee.

127 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee. Official Report, 11 March 2009, Col 1636.

128 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee. Official Report, 26 January 2009, Col 1475.

129 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee. Official Report, 25 February 2009, Col 1572-1573.

130 VOCAL. Written submission to the Health and Sport Committee.

131 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee. Official Report, 14 January 2009, Col1400.

132 Audit Scotland. (2008) A performance overview of sport in Scotland. Audit Scotland. Available at: http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/docs/central/2008/nr_080429_sport_overview.pdf [Accessed 11 May 2009]

133 Scottish Parliament Health and Sport Committee. Official Report, 25 February 2009, Col 1568.

134 Winning Scotland Foundation. Written submission to the Health and Sport Committee.

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